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Speaking of "innovations..."

Speaking of innovations, we received recognition for a Just In Time Training product developed for the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center(NDPTC) at the 2015 World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan. This showcase was a joint initiative of BBC Media Action, Global Network for Disaster Reduction (GNDR), Netherlands Red Cross, Plan International, and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR). It was an honor to work with Dr. Eddie Bernard, a Nobel Laureate and leading expert on tsunamis, on this project. As always, I'm grateful to the team at NDPTC for the opportunities to work on such impactful projects.

It's been a pretty hectic first half of 2015. Looking forward to even more action in the second half!

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We're going national!

Cool bit of news to share. Segments of video that I produced for the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center will be airing nationwide tomorrow morning (5/29/15) at 7:30am on Discovery Channel. Though my footage was used primarily as b-roll, a significant amount of the Innovations show features work I did for NDPTC. The footage spanned from Indonesia to Wisconsin to Puna and even my very own driveway where my hands make a brief cameo flying a DJI Phantom. Mahalo to NDPTC for the opportunity! 

http://tv.twcc.com/tv/innovations-series/9189821

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Guide to Social Media Image Sizes

Here's a great graphics cheat sheet for anyone managing multiple social media channels.  Image sizes and shapes are all over the map, from wide to tall, from square to round.  And, this is just for web browser interfaces.  3rd party social media clients such as Tweetbot add yet another twist, and even apps by the same company may look different depending on hardware platform.  Tweetbot, for example, displays profiles in rounded squares on their Mac client while using circles in their iOS app.  

As image makers, we're always considering the composition of our photos and videos.  It's not enough to capture a well lit, in-focus shot.  We need to think about how the image (still or motion) will be used.  Do we leave space for copy (text)?  If so, where?  Above?  Below?  To the left or right?  Social media interfaces add another twist - how can you leverage an image for a square format and an extra wide rectangle at the same time?  More thoughts on that issue coming soon.

 

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